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Creatively Inspired: Urs Fischer at the MoCA Grand Avenue

Posted by on 8/24/2013 to Inspiration
Urs Fischer MoCA

Urs Fischer MoCA

Urs Fischer MoCA

Urs Fischer MoCA

Urs Fischer MoCA


Urs Fischer MoCA

Urs Fischer MoCA

Last weekend, we saw the Urs Fischer exhibit at the MoCA in downtown Los Angeles the last day before it officially closed to the public. Prior to arriving, I knew what we'd see would be inspiring based on the sheer number of photos I'd seen on Instagram over the past few weeks. On social media, there seemed to be a certain energy and excitement surrounding talk of the exhibition. Nearly everyone online had something to say--whether it be through 140-character blurbs on Twitter, comments on Facebook, or Instagrammed photos of visitors interacting with the works. The online "buzz" not only convinced me to see the exhibit for myself, but also made me want to join in on the online conversation: share my own experiences and interaction with the works.

Overall, the exhibit was quirky and whimsical. That, combined with a photo-friendly museum policy, almost gave off the impression of an anything-goes, larger-than-life playground for grown-ups. Walking through the tall, haphazardly-cut entrance ways which connected one room to the next, I felt as if each room was almost a different world than the last. Melting street lamps, a parade of floating fruit, gaggle of "lively" skeletons, rainstorm frozen in time, and a woodsy cabin constructed solely of bread--the exhibit almost felt like a slightly edgier and perhaps more inspired version of Disneyland's "Toontown."

Incredible as it all was, what I enjoyed most about the exhibition was the range of work displayed. A retrospective, the exhibit included everything from sculpture and installation to photography and print, all intermingled with one another, and yet despite different mediums, they were all distinctly "Fischer"--marked with a magical, almost surrealist-kind of playfulness and imagination--so much so that it was virtually impossible to leave the exhibit uninspired.

--RD